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economy, 150 milon workers only now at about a 9 or 10% union total labor force, so, on relative basis weould be much better or worse time since 1980 whi we were opposo 26, 27, in the states, intriguingly, the states are not right to work states where unions can force a company to, people to pay dues et cetera, those states are falling behind. the empirical evidence, the re these guys get power the less the jobs get created. >> looking forward, not just now. we know that unions feel more empowered and their presidential candidate won the white house and union leaders saying they're going to congress and ask for easier ways for companies to become unionized. so, can we expect to see more of these plays against companies? >> absolutely, for the exact reason you noted. unions were obviously a big supporter of obama and the liberal agenda, and rightly so because they've worked nicely with each other, but as unions become bigger and bigger, bigger and the 9, 10% that toby said, it tends to work the opposite of what we want to see happen to jobs and unemployment. we want to see unemployment
and the jobs and economy. you can see what is happening with our twinkie and hostess and all . people who make them. they are out of the a job because of union workers who are demanding more. be lucky you have a job right now. >> wayne, if you look at thanksgiving to news years. and this is it super bowl for retailers for profits and unions know that and the timing is rough, don't you think? >> i don't see it that way. timing is off. you have merchandise in the tore right now. you caint sell it for the holiday season. what happens on black friday and going forward into the christmas season. all of that merchandise has to be here. you have to ordered that months ago. these strikes are not hurting it hurts the walmart protest that could hurt shopping. port authority in oakland not necessarily behaved. they are one of the mot notorous unions. >> and at the same time certainly labor has a right to have their voice and issues whethert is health care or pay. >> they are choosing america's holiday season to get their message across and get their employers on the spot. you think that turns the sentime
.s. economy. during the holiday-shortened week the markets moved in tandem for the fiscal cliff. up more midweek. the markets continued to climb on friday. stunning accusations that one of america's iconic companies hewlett-packard which acquired autonomy last year for $11 billion is accusing autonomy of what it called serious improprieties in its bookkeeping and inflating its own value. meg witman says the company lied about how much it was worth. >> we believe there's a willful effort on the part of certain members of autonomy management to mislead shareholders when they were a publicly held companies and mislead buyers including hp and we stand by the forensic review we have seen. as you know, we have turned it over to the fcc. >> we are shocked. we have been pretty ambushed by this today. first we heard about it was a press release and we refute them. they are factually incorrect. we'd like to learn more about them. i'm afraid the details haven't been shared with us. >> reporter: autonomy ceo said the company followed normal accounting practices. hp took an $8.8 billion charge this q
" and paul krugman, author wrote train to talk about problems facing the u.s. economy for about an hour 45 next on booktv. [applause] >> well, thank thank you very m. thanks to the passionate attitude and technology in shakespeare books for hosting the event this evening. i also am very excited. i think we are all very excited to see probably two people who i would say are unquestionably the most cited economists in the world today. [applause] in addition to being most cited, and as you all know, those are noble laureates, i would have to say from the vantage point of the institute of economic thinking that if i were to nominate two people as being the most courageous economists in the world and the most impactful, the subpoena to find a list. so we're very excited to be part of this conversation. [applause] as you know, each of them has written a book that pertains to our current challenges and circumstance. joe stiglitz spoke, "the price of inequality" and paul krugman's book, "end this depression now!" are part of your goodie bag tonight. therefore on behalf of them i will thank you for
investing, and ultimately that's what gets the economy going at a rate that we haven't yet enjoyed so far in this recovery. >> then, dan, are we feeling this way? you share the view that we are not -- we're not done with the fiscal cliff. we're not going to suddenly solve our fiscal problems. we certainly haven't been talking it up on the spending side. we've agreed -- we haven't agreed but there seems to be a movement toward the idea that some taxes will go up on the high end and the middle class won't see much of a tax increase. are we justified? >> i think the typical consumer is not like you and me and the other guests there. the typical consumer makes about $60,000 a year for their family. they're not getting tax dividends so they're not freaked up about those going up. they're concerned about their paychecks and paychecks have been more steady for the first time in several years, wages have gone up a little bit, and the biggest asset people own is a house. it's not just a volume of sales rising and construction but home values. and so with every passing week, a certain number of peo
to the new rules about to hit our already fragile economy and as fiscal cliff talks continue, big defense cuts are still on the table. so, should republicans embrace the sequester or make a deal to avoid it? welcome to the journal, editorial report. is the obamacare a sure thing or vast expansion of medicaid, heavily dependent on state implementation and a growing number of the governors are saying they won't do the federal government's bidding. wisconsin's scott walker is one of them and joins me now, governor, great to have you with us. >> paul, good to be with you. >> paul: when you wrote to the hhs secretary kathleen sebelius, you wouldn't set up a state exchange you wouldn't have the flexibility to make it work. why don't you elaborate on what you mean by lack of flexibility. >> each of the governors who run it, a state run, partnership or referring to the federal government. any folks that have a state run exchange they need to realize in the end there is no flexibility in terms of final outcome, there is no substantive difference between the three option, all of them lead to a fede
.7 trillion dollars. now's the time to imagine how we grow the economy, to help feed the economic recovery, and that growth will help reduce the debt. the conversation with the president was about that bigger frame, and how we think about it. and then imagining the suffering that everybody is seeing all across this country, how can we restore the american middle class if we continue to cut programs that support people staying either in the middle class or not falling from it. >> do you believe some form of entitlement reform has to be part of a "grand bargain," a large down payment of paying down the debt? >> i reject the notion of entitlement. i think these are guaranteed social insurance programs of this country committed to our elders and long time ago. we just had a national debate in the country where there were two different visions, one that said, you're on your own, and another that said we are in this together. the way that we think about medicare, medicaid, and social security has to be in the context of whether we're going to create jobs of people can support their families on.
are cutting back on spending and a bad deal for the economy? well, let's ask. ben stein, dagen mcdowell, charlie gasperino and gary k. want to start with you. bad deal for all of us? >> of course, look, business investment was already down last quarter over 1%, and the word uncertainty just pervades e air and its business, its consumer, how about philanthropic organizations don't no what kind of write-offs for charity and the worst the outcome is probably going to be more, and taxes are going to go up and of course there will be no spending cuts. >> and ben, it does sound ominous, even if you're not someone who reads the wall street journa the fiscal cliff, fiscal cliff, it could be the-- i don't know intimidation factor, it could actually be worse than going over the cliff. >> i think that's a brilliant point, charles. if we went over the cliff for a few months the impact would not be enormous, and uncertainty is a bad word and fear is a really, really bad words and these are the words that govern the economy today and imperative that democrats put their heart and soul into a com
we have to get strategic leadership that says that we need to get this engine and the economy pumping again. neil: do you think, and this is mentioned by mitt romney a lot. you know that you are going to do things differently? dubai that? >> evebody talks about reducing taxes because they want more capital to grow their business. but it's also regulations. businesses are confronted at the township and city level. >> here in chicago, you need 161 licenses to open up the business. >> if you open up a job shop, you have to have a license to give them a bath. it's ridiculous. why can't we consolidate some of these things and reduce the bureaucracy? it isn't about the people collecting anything but a paycheck. neil: they must realize that the more they push this, the more it it endangers the economy and their very jobs are online. >> you would think so, when you? there is a lot of evidence that says those people inside the beltway are living in a bubble. washington dc is the only city in the united states that has had taken continuous growthh >> what about when gas comes down? >> you have
by 20% stuff like that. the old problem was not enough spending in the economy. one player that should have been spending more was the government thinks to adolf felt hitler they did but they should have been doing to increase spending. there is overwhelming confirmation and this is a time to have the government spend more would pit -- but people to work and put capital to work it is hard politically because it is hard to persuade people which is why some of us write books. [laughter] >> host: someone argue with you to say you do the spending big issue of boost then you fall back. but we did not to. what happened? >> that is interesting story. a lot of people just like montgomery ward was a major store chain. but the major -- but he believed they would come back so he hoarded cash waiting for the depression to come back by the time it was clear they lost their position in the marketplace. is not steadied as much as it should have been but that story of what is going on is about excessive practice with the debt bubble and it burst leaving people stranded with too much debt. what happene
and argues that it hurts the economy. this is about 40 minutes. >> and howard hughes for research at the manhattan institute. thank you for joining us. the question of whether and how governments, particularly the federal government direct tax dollars to industries was a discussion last night presidential debate and is becoming an ongoing theme in the campaign. the term on which the finance and industries have also been the focus of intense debate, but probably the most contentious example of all is the one on which diana furchtgott-roth of the manhattan to senior fellow and speaker this afternoon focuses and are tightly regulating to disaster, have green jobs policies are damaging america's economy. in fact, she subjects the assumptions and policies which led to such elevated as of now bankrupt seller paid no manufacture as well as the electric car battery manufacturer to a withering analysis, which we at the institute have come to expect from this oxford trained economist who served as chief of staff of the council of economic advisers -- sorry. during the administration of pres
.s. economy and millions of american families have been struggling with unemployment and underemployment, net sales for the walton family has grown more than $70 billion since the start of the great recession. now, a lot of those families in the bottom half struggling with underemployment are in fact walmart workers. a leaked internal document revealed that the base pay at the sam's club stores can be as low as $8 an hour. that's a mere $16,000 a year. with wage increases in drips and drabs as low as 20 or 40 cents per hour. one study found that walmart employees in california were nearly 40% more likely to use public assistance to make ends meet. costing the state's taxpayers $86 million annually. that means people with jobs in that state are still having to turn to the public safety net to get by. because working at walmart is not sustainable employment. if walmart became the standard across all retailers in california, taxpayers would have to subsidize their fellow workers with an additional $410 million a year. yet according to a study by the policy development and advocacy administration
obama term in office? the economy, the fiscal cliff talks, the president's priorities in the next four years. our roundtable is here. david brooks of "the new york times." msnbc's reverend al sharpton. former ceo of hewlett-packard carly fiorina >> historian and film maker ken burns. and nbc chief foreign affairs correspondent andrea mitchell. and we'll hear from new york congressman, gregory meeks, as we check in on some of the hardest-hit victims of hurricane sandy and see how they offered thanks this weekend while surrounded by destruction. >>> from nbc news in washington, the world's longest-running television program, this is "meet the press." with david gregory. >>> president obama doing his part for the economy over the weekend out holiday shopping as part of small business saturday, picking up several children's book at an independent bookstore in arlington. >>> meanwhile, uncertainty in the middle east. more clashes in egypt over the weekend as police use tear gas this morning to disburse protesters in cairo. i want to start there. we have "new york times" columnist david broo
the government, we will close down the american economy and, in turn, the global economy. if they do not solve the issue of this runaway spending, get some way to stop borrowing in excess, he tells the president of the united states if we default on this, on our obligations and our ious, we will trigger a depression worse than the 1930s. anybody here remember the 19 1930s depression? you probably don't. i don't. i was not born, but i've read about it. it was a calamity for the world. tim geithner said to the president what, if we default on this, if we do not solve this problem, we will have an economic catastrophe that will make the 2008 financial crisis a footnote in the history books. anyone remember the 2008 financial crisis? that's coming not from some columnist or journalist, that is coming from well-informed secretary of the treasury. you think about this, there is a value in running scared. if you think about after 9/11, the terrorist attacks, one thing the country did collectively is they set up tsa, the screening at airports. there are all kinds of work, very significant work done to
proposed $1.6 trillion in new revenue? he wants to destroy the economy? come on. whon their right mind will allow that kind of increase to devastate the economy. it will not be hostess going out ofbusiness. >> lou: that is a good point and it is interesting, no one is talking about the fact that individual tax payments, taxpayer payments, internal revenue service, receipts from those taxpayers have risen 26% under the bush tax cuts, over the past two years which tells us that the awer here is growth. >> that's right. >> lou: i'm a simple fellow and i'd like to see everybody start talking to each other. let me turn to benghazi, because, the special prosecutor. there is a sense of hopelessness that is palpable in washington, d.c., right now. because, i don't believe the congress feels that it has the strength or the tools to actually penetrate the veil of denial and secrecy and opaqueness that is the administration, when it comes to what it has done. witness the last nine weeks. you are calling for a special prosecutor, and the fellow who has to do that work for the president of the unit
's no connection between our scientific understanding of the age of the earth and the economy. >> let me direct you there. let me disript you there and read you that quote because this was another part of his answer to gk saying that's a dispute among theologans and it has to do with with the economic comment or the united states. i think the age of the universe has zero to do with hour our economy is going to grow. what do you make of this. >> the reason we have smartphones and televisions is we're able to talk on opposite sides of the content. the classic thing for me is smoke detectors. we understand the nuclear reactions. without that deep understanding we wouldn't have everything that you can touch and see in our viern. so this claim that has nothing to do with the economy is just wrong. i'm not going after anybody's religion. that's not it. just the earth is not six or 10,000 years old. that's not. and furthermore, we rely on this -- on these discoveries for our everyday life, especially here in the developed world. >> bill nye's opinion there. >>> one trucker is lucky to be alive. take a loo
of the economy so if they get into trouble you have counterparty risk. if i owe you money and get in ouble it is your problem as well. it is closely intertwined. we saw this in 1998 with long-term capital management. no one had ever heard of it and this hedge fund got into trouble and it was deemed by wall street and the federal reserve to pose a systemic risk to the whole financial system so we never heard of it but had to bail out. rri: do we need more regulation? that is the first in a lot of people would say? >> first thing regulators want to do is regulate and they want a lot of complicated regulation. i don't think that is the answer but bringing this stuff out into the sunlight making these shadow banks show what sort of risks are opposed to the system would be a really good start so at least we have a sense of what is going on. gerri: for the regular american out there there's a whole world that is completely closed to them, has nothing to do with them but at the end of the day could make big trouble for regular investors. give us an example of how this could unwind. >> as we saw w
and strengthening our economy by investing in jobs, not cuts. as for the effectiveness of this campaign one conservative says this type of pressure from unions is nothing new. >> the fact that they are publicly saying what they have been privately saying helps the american people understand where obama's in trend and comes from but nothing has changed. >> the issue is in the fiscal cliff discussion democrats appear willing to put entitlements and spending on the table. republicans saying they're willing to do tax revenue and that could be or would be the key to any agreement to avoid the fiscal cliff and get the country's books back in order. gerri: you will be covering this for a long time. thanks for that. this black friday wal-mart shoppers think protests, it is not a superstore workers on the picket line. jeff flock joins us with more. jeff: a few of them but the majority were not wal-mart workers but members of other unions like the teamsters, the uaw, it was built today as a demonstration against the notion of working on thursday on thanksgiving. the day before black friday. but the p
that are behind these numbers are relate primarily to the economy and as we all know the economy is still sluggish but there is improvement. >> aaa estimates that 40% of travelers left the day before thanksgiving and 36% returning today and 25% tomorrow. it could be a long journey home. this is what it looked like on the 405 on los angeles on the big get away day with traffic backed up for miles. and on thanksgiving morning as drivers headed out on i-10 east in beamont, texas. a husband and wife were killed and 100 injured and the trail of wreckage stretched for two miles. forecasters say more fog and snow in parts of the midwest and northeast could make it trougher getti tougher getting home after a long holiday weekend. >> reporter: again, as this afternoon goes on, we're going to see the traffic build on this road. about a 10% drop, alex, than they spent last year. >> michelle franzen there. here's a big question. will the weather cooperate for travelers out there? here with the travel forecast to answer that for us is dylan. >> most areas will cooperate. you're just dealing with the traffic as
. it is is sapping the ability of the american economy to grow and it is topping -- zapping the ability of the average american to rise. until we look at the major core issues that are making the u.s. more attractive to business, we will go back to the fiscal cliff discussion over and over again. unless we can get our economy really moving and growing in the long run, these will just occur over and over again. we identified eight areas, as you mentioned, where we find there is broad consensus where we believe these things would really move the needle in a reasonable time frame, two, three, four years. there is some real bipartisan support. the first is the need of a sustainable budget compromise. that is widely accepted by all. two, easing on highly skilled immigration now. yes, when a broader immigration reform, but this is one of the abilities to really move rapidly to inject skills and to the economy and fill jobs badly need to be filled to sustain our growth. it is not a long-term solution and there, but it is a critical step we can take now that would really move the needle. we hav
will about the state of the economy but americans didn't hold back this holiday weekend. a record number of shoppers were out there, 247 million in all. the amount spent per shopper last year, total spending was up, online sales was up too. that doesn't include all the online spending about to happen tomorrow. we begin with kristen dahlgen at a mall in california. kristen. >> reporter: good evening, kate. those door buster deals may be gone but the shoppers aren't. you can see them up here wrapping up a retail at the national retail federation is calling as impressive as we've seen. from the moment doors opened thursday before the thanksgiving dishing were even done until they close tonight almost a quarter billion shoppers will have been online or in stores. >> put my sneakers on and go for it. >> reporter: shopping started earlier than ever. in spite of the employee protests, the early opening paid off. more than 35 million shopped on thanksgiving. six million more than last year. black friday was big too. 89 million brave the crowds in search of those hard to beat bargains up from 86
on skills, giving a big boost to their economies. it's not as if america doesn't need these people. american companies are struggling to fill 3.6 million job opening, many of them in science-related fields. meanwhile foreign students receive half of their doctorates in foreign fields and most all will head home after graduation. new york city mayor michael bloomberg calls it the single biggest problem facing the economy and argues that our current approach is national suicide. the good news is we may finally be on the road to a solution. immigration reform has been a taboo topic for the last few years as large and vocal voices within the republican party with considerable public support have blocked any mention of reform. the words they've wanted to hear are border fence and deportation. that's why mitt romney activated a policy of self-deportation during the prisonal campaign. that's why he lost the spanish vote and asian vote to president obama by a landslide. president obama seems emboldened and the republicans chasened. so we have an opening for a deal. what should it look like? >> well,
in and complete college represent a barrier that i believe will ultimately injured our economy. not only that, but a rapid change in technological revolutions has created a spatial mismatch between the kinds of jobs that are going to be available going forward and the kinds of people who are able to take those jobs. that problem is most acutely seen in urban communities, which have been coming to your point, dealing with more basic concerns more so than trying to prepare and get ready and respond to changes in going forward. that is for those who are actually going to college and graduated. we have not even talked about those who are not. our young people are following what is going on. they are seen with their older friends are dealing with an understandably wonder about their prospects. we have to play -- pay close attention to that. i am a high art educator and i teach in a public university system. in the state where i teach, virginia, you see a number of state legislative budget cuts for colleges and universities throughout the commonwealth. a virginia is one of 8 states that have cut at
that a couple of years ago -- it harms the economy. we're trying to help the economy. unless i'm convinced raising tax rates will be beneficial, obviously i think there's reason and grounds for my position. i also believe that we can and must get an agreement, otherwise i think first of all the markets are going to start reacting. >> chris: we'll talk about that in the next segment. finally the g.o.p. republicans had a rough night on election night. let's look at the breakdown of the numbers. you lost unmarried women by 36 points. hispanics by 44 points. young people by 23 points. does your party need to change, especially in its outreach to those groups on social issues like same-sex marriage and immigration reform? >> we have to have a bigger tent. no doubt about it. obviously we have to do immigration reform. there's no doubt whatsoever that the demographics are not on our side and we have to give a much more positive agenda. it can't be just being against the democrats and against harry reid and against obama. you have to be for things. we have to give them the contract with america th
.s. economy. a television series based on the united states is currently in development as well. we're pleased to welcome to hear about his newest book, a pitcher's history of the modern world, which in this case is going to be from 1898, two just after the second world war. please join me in welcoming larry schweikart. [applause] >> well, thanks so much to heritage foundation for inviting me here. it's really an honor and one that i wish my father was alive to see. heritage is one of those great bastian said liberty in a swelling sea of collect this and. you probably didn't know that you are getting somebody here who was the previous rock drummer. this later became significant learning -- as a learning experience when i began working on this film. but all along, my experience and about and were pretty informative. sma students i know about communism because i was in a rock band. we shared everything, had nothing to start. when mike allen and i would've "a patriot's history of the modern world," we identified three major elements that made up americanism. nevertheless, we never really provided
cartwright. much larger housing it. one-way ticket about this is that the great growing economy in china per capita carbon emissions levels go up about 100% if they stop at the level of wealthy but hybrid -- out by less than 30%. that's a huge difference. whether or not you live in global warming are worried about the price of gas at the pump, we have a lot to gain by china in the building of rather than a. i think the most important thing for america to do in order to encourage a to have it is to get it some urban policies interpret that means stopping our cities as if they are the ugly stepchildren of america and recognize them for the economic heart line, apart a chance -- the heartland for this country. the american dream can only mean a homeowner in the suburb every means rethinking policies that pay for highways with general tax revenues, driving people to drive longer distances, above all honor city schools which are such critical ingredient for urban success in such a critical problem which despite enormous hard work by people language, mayor menino, like the city council, are so far
the start of something big for the u.s. economy. 147 million people were expected to shop between friday and sunday. record numbers of shoppers are making purchases on their mobile devices or ipads, and for those who did venture out today, the foot traffic wasn't just at big box retailers but also at mom and pop neighborhood stores, part of a concerted effort to promote small business on this holiday saturday. nbc's michelle franzen has been out in the crowds today, she joins us in front of macy's, the flagship store in new york. good evening, michelle. >> reporter: good evening, kate. consumer confidence has been improving over the last few months, and retailers are hoping that new excitement along with the emotions of the holiday season will translate into a boost in sales. the hunt for deals today paid off for donna bunk, who was just getting started with her holiday shopping in new york city. >> not expecting to get a pair of boots but when you walk past these and they're only $30, how could you go wrong? >> reporter: just the attitude retailers are banking on that the crucial holida
. that's important in the economies of scale and fighting the inevitable battle with the opponent, the competitor. the other thing i didn't get to talk in the previous item that was alarming to us right now what staff is telling us is that their intention is to always have the commercial customers be an opt in. and in mirren they did not do it that way. they included commercial customers recently in their full opt out process. in san francisco most of the energy is used by commercial customers. we will not be able to achieve that big beautiful build-out that we're planning without those commercial customers being put into an opt out so enough of them stay in to get the bonding ability and the economies of scale to make sure that we can do the full build out and hire the thousands of people, et cetera. thanks. >> you said that marin opt in? >> no, marin, they did their initial thing a couple of years ago. they just completed their enrollment and enrolled all of their customers a few months ago, and that included commercial customers who were then able to opt out if they wanted to.
about that from? >> yes, the economy has been growing nonstop since 1961 and it was absolutely powerful, moving ahead that a steam engine in 64 and 65 and begins to have trouble in 65 and another minor breaking point here. in the early 60s i went through a book called print executions which covers in part this. this was a time of the grandiose expectations and johnson was nothing if not grandiose. he's larger than the state of texas. he's this great big guy. not much of a speaker, but really on top of everything. people are contrasted into obama and usually obama doesn't come out in these and the way johnson managed congress. he's constantly on the phone, counseling at the white house, really on top of things. clearly he wanted to get these things done. people used to think johnson was this characteristically boisterous texan image conservative in civil rights. but i will pour into his background. by 1965, clearly with a strong liberal and believed that government could do good things and he would get them done. >> so much of what has happened in american society during the late 20th ce
. >> how do we move our country forward and reduce the deficit? by creating jobs and growing our economy, not by cutting programs that families rely on most. for working families it's all about putting americans back to work. not cutting the things we rely on most. >> there are signals they can't accept the kind of entitlement reforms in medicare and social security that senator graham is saying are prerequisite to a deal. >> let me tell you, first, george, and you know this, social security does not add one penny to our debt. not a penny. it's a separate funded operation. and we can do things and i believe we should now, smaller things, played out over the long term that gives its solvency. medicare is another story. only 12 years of solvency lie ahead if we do nothing. those who say don't touch it, don't change it are ignoring the obvious. we want medicare to be there for today's seniors and tomorrow, as well. we don't want to go to the poll and voucherizing it and we can make meaningful reforms without compromising the integrity of the program, making sure that the beneficiaries are n
empty fields. everyday you see all the ways all of us at us bank are helping grow our economy. lending more so companies and communities can expand, grow stronger and get back to work. everyday you see all of us serving you, around the country, around the corner. us bank. hurry in this saturday and sunday for great deals. like the lucid by lg, free. or the galaxy nexus by samsung, free. this weekend, get the best deals on the best devices on the best network. exclusively at verizon. [ gordon ] for some this line is a convenience. how you doing today? i'm good thanks. how are you? i'm good. [ gordon ] but for others, it's all they can afford. every day nearly nine million older americans don't have enough to eat. anything else? no, not today. join me, aarp, and aarp foundation in the drive to end hunger by visiting drivetoendhunger.org. get selsun blue for itchy dry scalp. strong itch-fighters target scalp itch while 5 moisturizers leave hair healthy. selsun blue. got a clue? get the blue. >>> good morning, washington, d.c. take a good look at the shot of the capitol building there. the
? >> they pitch them as free. but the over all economy. this is a large cost. look at current recovery since june 2009 and since that time median incomes are down 4600 on average. during the recession. they wer down on average 2800. and so it was a great cost. >> and when you hear free from the government reach for your wallet and you will be paying for it if you are a taxpayer. college students and parents fed up with saring tuition and crying ful. but some in the forbes team say it is it great for students and could lower tuition . there is it a flip side you lock p.m. eastern time and now bac to forbes on fox. just in time for the college football. new report shows that coaches are scoring big-time. froof them making two million bucks a season and a lot of parents and students are calling for cuts to help cut college costs. john, you say that is good for schools and students. you got to explain. this is a flip side. >> absolutely. parents and students need to relax and realize that football coaches get a fraction of all of the money. donations go up that pray for all of the other athletic team
that ultimately drives value to the american economy. our customer, i can completely agree with what shannon said in terms of our business objective, so to speak, is to empower entrepreneurs and innovators, to create jobs. that's a metric of success, not revenue generated per data set or some other per ifervance metric. the other piece of that looking back to the example of weather and gps, my monetization, is that together they contribute $100 billion to the american economy last year. last year alone from just those two data liberations. so, that is the way in which we are approaching from a strategy perspective, the ultimate impact to our customers. >> one super quick. one thing the city of san francisco or big cities or federal, right, the other smaller cities, smaller cities have smaller budgets. having a structure to support all this open data takes a lot of money. so, when these small cities are thinking about this, they should think about a way of somehow equalizing because they are putting into having these open data team, right? so, what does make sense? this is kind of an open question
by the clothier barren who says the economy has been tough on small businesses. >> so anything we can do to help us out, bring attention to our cause, if you will, is that much better. >> reporter: the next big marketing day is cyber monday and adobe marketing says that day alone should bring in $2 billion. reporting live, don knapp, cbs 5. >>> hamas deployed more police to the gaza border with israel. the rare move by the group in control of the gaza strip followed intervention by egyptian mediators. they urged both sides to preserve the truce that ended eight days of fierce exchange of fire between israel and hamas. the extra police presence is intended to keep gaza residents away from the fence that is secured by israeli soldiers. >>> protestors are once again gathering tahrir square in cairo. people are angry about president mohammed morsi giving himself nearly absolute power. as cbs 5 reporter ines ferre tells us -- >> reporter: demonstrators ran from egyptian police who launched tear gas cannisters into the crowd. it's the second day of protests over president morsi's decree giving him swe
by this man, who says the economy has been tough on small businesses. >> so anything we can do to help bring attention to our cause is that much better. >> reporter: there's one more big marketing day. it's cyber monday. that's the day after tomorrow. and one firm is predicting that on that day alone, internet buying will total $2 billion. reporting live in walnut creek, don knapp, cbs 5. in egypt today, a prominent opposition leader accused president morsi of giving himself the powers of a pharaoh. they called the expansion of his powers an unprecedented attack on judicial independence. >> reporter: the protests continued today in egypt, though they were much smaller than yesterday. egyptians who believe that president mohammed morsi has made a brazen power grab clashed with authorities. but many supported president morsi's expanded role. the spokesperson says it's temporary and not democrat because mr. morsi won 52% of the vote in the presidential election. >> it's everywhere. democracy is, of course -- after the election, it's over. they would all have to wait for years for the one who i
on the margin. >> one i think i think it's not just for the fiscal cliff, but if our economy is going to need mobilization to get more jobs here, fewer exports abroad, then you've got to have some c.e.o.s come in, like f.d.r. did. f.d.r. brought in the head of chrysler and sears and roebuck. he had two top republicans in his cabinet, and i know c.e.o.s don't like to come to government because they have to give out all the stuff they have, those taxes. those are the people i think that want to help their country. the country has been so good to them. arlet them try to figure out how to get our country moving again. >> and i think obama has to realize the moment. for a re-elected president there is so much good will out there, even among his opponents. now, we had an election which i think was decided but not decisive. there were, what, 57 million people who voted for romney. and there is a way that obama can kind of step forward and say, "these are the ideas. this is the method we're going to do this." he can-- i mean, you know, you talk to this man-- i mean, you don't get to talk to the peopl
about the economy. >> when does this end? >> we have a plan. we are working on it. >> is getting worse. >> the people on top chose to look away. >> if the transactions are so useful, how come they brought down the financial system? >> my parents fight about money. >> i told my wife, this is not america. it is full of wonderful people. we will see if they can help us. >> it is tough on us. >> i will ask personal questions. do you smoke? curse? >> it is a question that has to be answered. >> you are very friendly. >> what is wrong with you? >> i do get it. >> you are simpletons. >> i ask you a simple question. >> did you think you would get away with that? >> that is an excellent question. >> you are you? >> how many times have you been indicted? >> do you have any friends? >> you have got it wrong. >> how does that make sense? >> what do you think is going on here. >> i am gay and jewish. >> what kind of republican are you? >> afghanistan. >> health care bill. >> the unemployment problem. >> we have got a lot more work to do. >> why is it taking so long? >> when we flew over this, i sai
where they can. >> the factors that are behind these numbers relate primarily to the economy and, as we all know, the economy is still sluggish but there is improvement. >> reporter: aaa estimates 45% of travelers left the wednesday before thanksgiving with 36% returning today and another 25% returning on monday. and if the big travel day before thanksgiving was any indication, it could be a long journey home. this is what it looked like on the 405 in los angeles on the big getaway day with traffic backed up for miles. and on thanksgiving morning, as drivers headed out on i-10 east outside beaumont, texas, dense fog caused a deadly chain reaction pileup involving 100 vehicles. husband and wife, vincent and debbie leggieo, were killed. 100 people injured and the trail of twisted wreckage stretched for two miles. and now forecasters say more fog and even snow in parts of the midwest and northeast could make it a little tougher getting home after a long holiday weekend. and, again, the roads along the new jersey turnpike this hour so far so good but later today, erica, this could be a virt
reflection on us all. now through january 2nd. not in this economy. we also have zero free time, and my dad moving in. so we went to fidelity. we looked at our family's goals and some ways to help us get there. they helped me fix my economy, the one in my house. now they're managing my investments for me. and with fidelity, getting back on track was easier than i thought. call or come in today to take control of your personal economy. get one-on-one help from america's retirement leader. so i brought it to mike at meineke. we gave her car a free road handling check. i like free. free is good. my money. my choice. my meineke. >>> welcome back to cnn sunday morning. i'm randi kaye. here are some of the stories that we're watching right now. today is expected to be one of the busiest travel days of the year. pack some patience. nearly 2.5 million thanksgiving holiday travellers will be catching a flight back home. millions more will be on the road. triple-a projecting 43.6 million americans are traveling during this long holiday weekend. that is, three million more than last year. >>> in washi
serious damage to the economy. they also sounded warnings. >> we can and must get an agreement, otherwise, i think first of all the markets are going to start reacting. >> it's not a done deal and it's not a certainty. if congress does nothing, which congress has gotten pretty good at doing these days, we'll go over the fiscal cliff. >> reporter: staffers have been working behind the scenes to find common ground to prevent across the board cuts lawmakers say should concern everyone. >> you should be worried, we all ought to be worried whether we are dependent upon other aspects of the federal budget, whether we're worried about the the regulation of food safety, about our borders being secured, about the fbi being supported. >> reporter: democrats and the president want to raise tax rates for the wealthy. republicans don't. though more are now breaking with anti-tax crusader grover nor quist, who got a majority of republican lawmakers to pledge not to support any effort to raise taxes. >> i'm willing to generate revenue, it's fair to ask my party to put revenue on the table, i will not ra
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